Jenny’s Brain

FRONTAL LOBE

The Executive

When Jenny is at work, her frontal lobe helps her think through complex problems, dealing with the big picture and the small details at the same time to make sure that nothing is overlooked.

As Jenny weighs the pros and cons of her current relationship, her frontal lobe helps her decide if breaking things off is a good idea.

In the morning when her alarm goes off, Jenny’s frontal lobe helps her get up instead of giving in to the impulse to hit the snooze button.

Instead of lashing out when Jenny gets angry, her frontal lobe helps her react more appropriately for the situation.

As a survivor of childhood sexual abuse, Jenny’s frontal lobe has fewer resources to process information and help her limbic system relax. Part of the healing process is getting the frontal lobe and limbic system to work together.

LIMBIC SYSTEM

The Emotionalist

Jenny’s limbic system reminds her of painful things in the past to help her avoid them in the present. For example, every time she drives past her old school, she’s glad she never has to go back.

The limbic system helps Jenny seek out things she finds pleasurable like bubble baths, comfortable blankets, and warm tea on a cold day.

When Jenny walks past a house with a snarling, barking dog in the yard, her limbic system triggers her fight, flight, or freeze mechanism.

Even though Jenny is trying to take better care of her body, her limbic system encourages her to give in to her cravings and compulsions that made her feel good in the past, like eating for comfort.

Jenny, because of her childhood trauma, has a limbic system in overdrive that can lead to triggers, unwanted memories surfacing, becoming overly emotional, or dissociation, especially without a fully working frontal lobe.

BETWEEN BOTH


Letting either side take over isn’t a good idea. You need the frontal lobe and limbic system to work together to be happy, healthy, and continue to heal.


FRONTAL LOBE

The Executive

When Jenny is at work, her frontal lobe helps her think through complex problems, dealing with the big picture and the small details at the same time to make sure that nothing is overlooked.

As Jenny weighs the pros and cons of her current relationship, her frontal lobe helps her decide if breaking things off is a good idea.

In the morning when her alarm goes off, Jenny’s frontal lobe helps her get up instead of giving in to the impulse to hit the snooze button.

Instead of lashing out when Jenny gets angry, her frontal lobe helps her react more appropriately for the situation.

As a survivor of childhood sexual abuse, Jenny’s frontal lobe has fewer resources to process information and help her limbic system relax. Part of the healing process is getting the frontal lobe and limbic system to work together.


BETWEEN BOTH


Letting either side take over isn’t a good idea. You need the frontal lobe and limbic system to work together to be happy, healthy, and continue to heal.


LIMBIC SYSTEM

The Emotionalist

Jenny’s limbic system reminds her of painful things in the past to help her avoid them in the present. For example, every time she drives past her old school, she’s glad she never has to go back.

The limbic system helps Jenny seek out things she finds pleasurable like bubble baths, comfortable blankets, and warm tea on a cold day.

When Jenny walks
past a house with a snarling, barking dog in the yard, her limbic system triggers her fight, flight, or freeze mechanism.

Even though Jenny is trying to take better care of her body, her limbic system encourages her to give in to her cravings and compulsions that made her feel good in the past, like eating for comfort.

Jenny, because of her childhood trauma, has a limbic system in overdrive that can lead to triggers, unwanted memories surfacing, becoming overly emotional, or dissociation, especially without a fully working frontal lobe.